Presentation

Statuevision employs custom software, (see Figure 1)  implemented in Max, openFrameworks, and OpenGL Shaders. Several overarching goals guide Statuevision’s software development: 1) an intuitive and gesturally controlled system for animating 3D models in real time, 2) a performative storytelling rubric with well defined rolls for the speaker, the audience and the assistant. 3) platforms and technologies that be embedded in future versions of the project, thereby removing the need for laptops in future performances. These visuals are then projected onto the city at night.

Figure 1. Statuevision Software: Models are animated on the computer screen in real time, controlled by the custom mobile application.
 Statuevision Software: Models are animated on the computer screen in real time, controlled by the custom mobile application.

About Statuevision

Statuevision is an interactive public projection performance that engages citizens in conversations about urban histories. Statuevision: Glasgow invites participants to explore Glasgow’s history through its iconic statues and monuments. This performance employs interactive technologies that enable participants to animate three- dimensional renderings of the cities statues while learning about the lives of the figures.

Process

Statuevision begins with the wealth of local and world history embedded in the figurative statues installed throughout a city. Statuevision leverages a range of characters, poses, histories and contemporary references represented by the historical statuary on two levels: first, the project makes use of the statues’ potential as focal points for meaningful conversations about history and public space; second, Statuevision explores their potential as a medium for learning with the aid of technology. Using existing and freely available technologies, the Statuevision team creates accurate 3D models of approximately fifty local statues. The 3D models are made using the free and online 123D Catch tool, which allows users to generate  3D models of an object with just a few dozen still images taken from various angles around the object, (see Figure 1.)

These models are then further refined using MeshLab, another freely available and open source tool2 performance, custom software, (see Figure 2,). The process of creating Statuevision generates a number of archives that are now freely available to artists, educators or researchers. A full set of 3D models are now shared through SketchFab, a resource that allows social sharing and downloading of 3D models, (seen in Figure 3.) , a freely accessible online tool.

Figure 1. Using 123D catch, this statue of George Washington is photographed from all possible angles, and made into a three-dimensional model, available to download.
Figure 1. Using 123D catch, this statue of George Washington is photographed from all possible angles, and made into a three-dimensional model, available to download.
Figure 2. Meshlab is used to edit and clean up the models.
Figure 2. Meshlab is used to edit and clean up the models.
Figure 3. All models are available for download on Sketchfab.com/Statuevision
Figure 3. All models are available for download on Sketchfab.com/Statuevision